No one ever died of a number [Did they?]

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Have you ever seen a picture on Facebook of someone who’s about the same age or older than you doing something particularly impressive………..

Maybe they’ve got in shape, ran a marathon, completed some sort of event, etc………..

And it’s accompanied by the phrase “Age is nothing but a number”.

I see it quite a lot from fellow FitPros.

Alongside a client success of theirs.

And I get it.

But……………

No one ever died of a number did they?

People die “of old age”, don’t they?

I know there’s a specific reasons they’ve finally died, of course.

But it’s generally accepted that the body can only take so much “living” before it packs in in some way.

Often the FitPro sharing the “Age is nothing but a number” comment is relatively young.

Injury, illness and ache and pain free.

And there’s nothing wrong with that, of course.

Be nice to be back there again, wouldn’t it?

But, does dismissing the affect of our aging bodies completely help?

Maybe we could see our bodies more like a car.

We know as it gets older, it’ll require a bit more TLC.

The first third or so of it’s life we usually do next to nothing with it.

Then, gradually, it requires more ‘work’.

We can slow that aging process considerably.

Some 10 year old cars have been scrapped already due to not been taken care of.

Some look and run not far off as good as new.

Some classic cars are still in great nick after half a century or more.

The age is a consideration and not to be ignored.

But how much care has been taken over those years is, arguably, the bigger factor.

The main difference in the analogy of our bodies to our cars is that of the ‘cost’.

We could keep spending a bit continuously and keep our car roughly as is (at least massively slowing down the ageing on it).

As we can keep on top of exercise, eating, etc (and the cost of time and effort that go into them) over the years.

Or, maybe, we’ve let it get a bit ‘run down’.

There’s a bigger bill to pay now to get it back to where we’d like it.

It might never quite get back to that showroom look.

But we can probably get much closer.

Age isn’t just a number.

But we can minimise the effect that number has to have 🙂

Much love,

Jon ‘Wang’ Hall

P.S. If you feel you want to start ‘fixing’ a bit of that wear and tear, we can help. You can apply for a place on the programme at www.myrise.co.uk/apply

About The Author

Jon Hall

When not helping people to transform their lives and bodies, Jon can usually be found either playing with his kids or taxi-ing them around. If you'd like to find out more about what we do at RISE then enter your details in the box to the right or bottom of this page or at myrise.co.uk - this is the same way every single one of the hundreds who've described this as "one of the best decisions I've ever made" took their first step.