“Not much has changed but we live underwater” [That’s a big change, no?]

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I was listening to the the wireless the other day.

I know most have referred to it as the radio since before I was born but my granny used to call it that and I say it as a ‘Dad joke’ to wind the kids up.

The song ‘Year 3000’ by Busted came on.

Which chronicles the (presumably made up) trip the lads took to a thousand years in the future.

Via a time machine their neighbour Peter had made in his garden.

“Not much has changed” they sing.

“But we live underwater”.

Fairly big change that lads.

“Triple breasted women swim around town totally naked!” they continue.

Also somewhat different.

Not seen that outside of Total Recall.

Peter also observes that the singer (Charlie – I had to Google that, honest!) has a “great, great, great grand daughter”.

Who “is pretty fine”.

Down five generations in a millennium.

Everyone involved having to live to (and still reproduce at) 200 years of age.

Another fairly significant change.

In fact nothing mentioned in the song about the future isn’t very different.

Things can often have changed without us realising it.

Or we forget to take those changes into account.

We maybe don’t have the same body we had 10, 20 or 30 years ago.

That’s life, unfortunately.

We can either beat ourselves up over that and then do things that make it worse still.

Or we can do what we can to maintain it.

Maybe to return it’s condition to somewhere in between.

But that’s better than allowing it to get worse because it’ll never be as good as new.

And sometimes we’re still using habits that have long since ceased to be needed.

Permanent solutions to temporary problems.

We carry on eating in a way we started because someone else was feeding us.

Or because of someone else’s preferences.

Or because it was easier when we were rushed.

Or that was all we knew at the time.

Or it was all we could afford.

Or it was what we thought at the time was a good choice (from a health or other perspective).

And years or decades later we’re still doing that.

Even though some or all of those reasons may no longer apply.

And maybe a different approach would serve us better now.

But we’ve “always done it this way”.

Permanent solutions to temporary problems.

Despite what the Busted boys like to tell you, things change.

Our body has changed.

We can work with that to make the best of it or resent it and make it worse.

And we can allow the way we do things (eating or otherwise) to change.

Because if we always do what we’ve always done, we’ll always get what we’ve always got.

If nothing changes, nothing changes.

Much love,

Jon ‘What I Go To School For’ Hall

About The Author

Jon Hall

When not helping people to transform their lives and bodies, Jon can usually be found either playing with his kids or taxi-ing them around. If you'd like to find out more about what we do at RISE then enter your details in the box to the right or bottom of this page or at myrise.co.uk - this is the same way every single one of the hundreds who've described this as "one of the best decisions I've ever made" took their first step.